Posts Tagged 'comic books'

Wonder Woman, Truth, and a Bit of Bondage: ‘Lasso of Truth’ Review

Lasso of Truth based on Wonder Woman

The Guy (Matt Myers) and The Girl (Christen Orr), photo by BreeAnne Clowdus, courtesy of Synchronicity Theatre.

As befitting a play inspired by Golden Age Wonder Woman, Lasso of Truth flaunts a complex collection of seemingly contradictory themes including subjugation, freedom, betrayal, and the subjectivity of truth. Continue reading ‘Wonder Woman, Truth, and a Bit of Bondage: ‘Lasso of Truth’ Review’

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An Open Letter About Racist Caricature to the Creative Team Behind ‘She-Hulk’

She-Hulk #4 (2014) by Charles Soule and Javier Pulido

Dear creative team of She-Hulk,

It’s great seeing Shulkie back in an ongoing series, especially one as unique as She-Hulk.

Soule’s storytelling and Pulido’s art are engaging, fun, and wholly unlike anything else on the shelves, but we need to have a serious discussion about issue #4.

Since when is all crime in San Fran committed by racist caricatures? Continue reading ‘An Open Letter About Racist Caricature to the Creative Team Behind ‘She-Hulk’’

Listen to ‘Wonder Women: The Strength Of Female Superheroes’

Wonder Women independent documentary title cardLast week, I had the pleasure of appearing on KCUR 89.3 FM’s Up to Date along with Kristy Guevara-Flanagan, the director of Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines and Dr. Brenda Bethman, the Director of the Women’s Center at UMKC.  Continue reading ‘Listen to ‘Wonder Women: The Strength Of Female Superheroes’’

Catch Me Discussing Wonder Women on KCUR 89.3 FM’s Up to Date

KCUR's Up to Date LogoTomorrow, April 22, 2014, I’ll be a guest on  KCUR 89.3 FM’s Up to Date!

I’ll be discussing Wonder Woman and other Golden Age superheroines along with fellow guests Kristy Guevara-Flanagan, director of Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines and Dr. Brenda Bethman, Director of the Women’s Center at UMKC.

I’ll be on air from 11am-noon CST. You can catch it on KCUR’s instant stream, available for both Windows and iTunes.

[Update: You can now listen to the recorded episode at Up to Date.]

Black History Month Giveaway: ‘March: Book One’

March (Book One) by Andrew Aydin and Congressman John Lewis and Nate Powell In celebration of Black History Month, I’m giving away a brand new copy of March: Book One by civil rights leader John Lewis. Coauthored by Andrew Aydin with art by Nate Powell (Swallow Me Whole), March is the graphic memoir of Rep. Lewis’ life and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. 

Specifically, March: Book One deals with Lewis’ childhood in rural Alabama, his first meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., and his involvement in the Nashville Student Movement’s nonviolent fight against segregation. (For more on his many achievements, check out my previous post on Rep. John Lewis.) Continue reading ‘Black History Month Giveaway: ‘March: Book One’’

Black History Month Giveaway: ‘Captain America: Truth’

Truth: Red, White & Black by Robert Morales and Kyle BakerIn celebration of Black History Month, I’m giving away copies of two of my favorite comics on the Journey Into Awesome Facebook page! First up is a new hardcover copy of Captain America: Truth (originally published as Truth: Red, White & Black) by Robert Morales (Captain America) and Kyle Baker (Why I Hate Saturn).

A blatant reference to the horrific real world Tuskegee StudyTruth is the tragic tale of a group of African American soldiers involuntarily subjected to an experimental version of the Super-Soldier Serum by the U.S. government. Continue reading ‘Black History Month Giveaway: ‘Captain America: Truth’’

In Defense of the Mutant Oppression Metaphor (Part 4)

Dazzler threatened by police in front of anti-mutant protesters

Dazzler threatened by police in front of anti-mutant protesters

The following is the final in a series examining the validity of the X-Men’s mutant oppression metaphor. Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 before proceeding.

I’ve previously discussed several ways mutants are persecuted in the Marvel Universe. Since the X-Men are superheroes, most of these systems of oppression tend to take the form of things that can be punched into submission. Unfortunately, most real world modes of oppression aren’t so easily overcome. Continue reading ‘In Defense of the Mutant Oppression Metaphor (Part 4)’

In Defense of the Mutant Oppression Metaphor (Part 3)

The Hulk breaks Colossus' arms. The following is the third in a series examining the validity of the X-Men’s mutant oppression metaphor. You should read Part 1 and Part 2 before proceeding.

Previously, I discussed the dissimilar treatment between mutant and non-mutant super heroes, the role fear plays in oppression, and how the X-Men aren’t really representative of the mutant population.

The X-Men are simply those lucky few born with badass powers and afforded the opportunities and training to effectively use them. They may be the most powerful mutants around, but power is relative Continue reading ‘In Defense of the Mutant Oppression Metaphor (Part 3)’

In Defense of the Mutant Oppression Metaphor (Part 2)

A Little Mutant Girl from Marvels by Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross The following is the second in a series examining the validity of the X-Men’s mutant oppression metaphor. You should read Part 1 before proceeding.

Last post, I highlighted the difference in the public treatment of mutant and “human” superhero teams in order to establish the absurdity of fearing mutants over “normal” superpowered people. I also discussed how this fear is wielded by the majority in an effort to justify the hate and oppression of the mutant people.

But really, this argument needs to be taken a step further as most of the X-Men don’t represent the average mutant’s abilities, opportunities, or life experiences. Continue reading ‘In Defense of the Mutant Oppression Metaphor (Part 2)’

In Defense of the Mutant Oppression Metaphor (Part 1)

Triage arrested in

Triage arrested for using his abilities to heal an injured friend.

On two previous posts about the “M-word” and the mutant oppression metaphor, a couple commenters voiced concerns about the feasibility of using superpowered mutants as an effective metaphor for oppressed groups.

Readers have brought up some valid points, including the possibility that unlike real world oppressed groups, mutants really are dangerous, as well as the idea that their superpowers invalidate the comparison to real subjugated people. I think both points are interesting and deserve a larger exploration.

Do I still think that a group with super powers can serve as an effective oppression metaphor? Continue reading ‘In Defense of the Mutant Oppression Metaphor (Part 1)’


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