Archive for the 'Women in Comics' Category



Listen to ‘Wonder Women: The Strength Of Female Superheroes’

Wonder Women independent documentary title cardLast week, I had the pleasure of appearing on KCUR 89.3 FM’s Up to Date along with Kristy Guevara-Flanagan, the director of Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines and Dr. Brenda Bethman, the Director of the Women’s Center at UMKC.  Continue reading ‘Listen to ‘Wonder Women: The Strength Of Female Superheroes’’

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Sisters in Arms: Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 5

Golden Age Etta Candy and the Holliday Girls art by H. G. Peter

This is the fifth of a multi-part examination of Brian Azzarello’s current run on “Wonder Woman.” It’s recommended that you go back and read the series from the beginning.

SPOILERS for Wonder Woman #0-20 ahead.

Women’s Solidarity and Camaraderie

Marston’s Wonder Woman champions for a sense of solidarity among women. Diana’s relationship with the Amazons, Etta Candy, and the Holliday Girls all firmly establish the importance of women’s camaraderie as a central theme of Wonder Woman. Continue reading ‘Sisters in Arms: Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 5′

Rape, Murder, Slavery, and Infanticide: Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 4

Wonder Woman #7 by  Brian Azzarello and Cliff ChiangThis is the fourth of a multi-part examination of Brian Azzarello’s current run on “Wonder Woman.” It’s recommended that you go back and read the series from the beginning.

SPOILERS for Wonder Woman #0-20 ahead.

Rape, Murder, Slavery, and Infanticide

Even more controversial than the changes made to Wonder Woman’s origins are these pages from the now infamous Wonder Woman #7. Continue reading ‘Rape, Murder, Slavery, and Infanticide: Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 4′

Trained in the Ways of War: Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 3

Wonder Woman #0 by Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang This is the third of a multi-part examination of Brian Azzarello’s current run on “Wonder Woman.” It’s recommended that you go back and read the series from the beginning

SPOILERS for Wonder Woman #0-20 ahead.

Trained in the Ways of War

Wonder Woman #0 introduces another interesting addition to the mythos. In this fun, Silver Age-styled romp set 11 years in the past, War becomes so impressed with the accomplishments of the then 12-year old Diana that he offers to further train her in the art of war. This is presumably to groom her to one day assume his throne. Continue reading ‘Trained in the Ways of War: Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 3′

From Dirt to Divinity: Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 2

Hippolyta-makes-Diana-out-of-clay-Wonder Woman #2 This is the second of a multi-part examination of Brian Azzarello’s current run on “Wonder Woman.” It’s recommended that you go back and read the series from the beginning

SPOILERS for Wonder Woman #0-20 ahead.

From Dirt to Divinity

Wonder Woman #3 introduces us to Azzarello’s first major change to the Wonder Woman mythos: the revelation of Zeus as Diana’s father. Continue reading ‘From Dirt to Divinity: Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 2′

Diana Doesn’t Need a Misogynist Ally : Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 1

Wonder Woman #1 (2011) cover almost textlessIn the comments of my previous post about Wonder Woman’s feminist origins and how changes in the character often resulted from historical changes in the social role of women, several readers expressed an interest in my interpretation of Brian Azzarello’s controversial Wonder Woman series.

Well, I’m glad you asked.

Before I go any further, I should address the giant misogynist elephant in the room.

Continue reading ‘Diana Doesn’t Need a Misogynist Ally : Examining Azzarello’s ‘Wonder Woman’ Part 1′

Listen to the Recording of ‘Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Cosplay and Fandom’

Dragon Con LogoWe had an amazing turnout at the “Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Cosplay and Fandom” panel at Dragon Con. It was only scheduled for an hour but since we had such an awesome and engaged audience we ended up keeping the panel going for over three hours.

If you weren’t able to make it to the panel, you can now check out the audio recording!

Thank you to everyone who came out to make it the highest attended panel at this year’s Comics & Popular Arts Conference. It was truly exhilarating to be able to talk to so many intelligent people passionate about the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in comics, cosplay, and geek culture.

Abstract: ‘Tights, Tits, and Titian: Female Objectification from the Italian Renaissance to Contemporary Comics’

Ultimate Comics Thor Vol 1 #1 textless Scott J. Campbell variant (2010)

Women as accessories

As previously announced, I’ll be presenting “Tights, Tits, and Titian: Female Objectification from the Italian Renaissance to Contemporary Comics” at the 6th Annual Comics & Popular Arts Conference at Dragon Con 2013!

Here’s my presentation’s abstract as a little sneak peek.

From art historical depictions of “Venus,” odalisques, and nude bathers to the improbably proportioned superheroines of contemporary comics, the female form has long been the subject of objectification. Continue reading ‘Abstract: ‘Tights, Tits, and Titian: Female Objectification from the Italian Renaissance to Contemporary Comics’’

Come See Me Speak About Gender in Comics at Dragon Con 2013

Dragon Con Logo

I’m very pleased to announce that I’ll be speaking at Dragon Con 2013 next week as part of the Annual Comics & Popular Arts Conference!

I’ll be presenting “Tights, Tits, and Titian: Female Objectification from the Italian Renaissance to Contemporary Comics” as part of “Gender, Race, and Identities in Comics.”

I’ll also be a panelist on “Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Cosplay and Fandom.” Check out all the details below!

Continue reading ‘Come See Me Speak About Gender in Comics at Dragon Con 2013’

Gendered Language: X-Men, X-Women, or X-People?

Jubilee, Kitty Pryde, Storm, Rogue, Rachel Summers, and Psylocke on the cover X-Men Vol 4 #2

This past Wednesday, the female-lead X-Men #1 by Brian Wood and Olivier Coipel hit the stands. The reviews have been overwhelmingly positive and I’m happy to report that it’s well worth a buy.

The series’ all-woman cast has led to a lively Internet discussion with many questioning the appropriateness of the comic’s gendered title. At first, I thought there might be some validity to the criticism, but the more I reflect on Marvel’s decision, the more I think that they made the right call. Continue reading ‘Gendered Language: X-Men, X-Women, or X-People?’


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